Donald Trump is, I am sure, thankful today

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Home for sale today in Dayton, Ohio, Farmersville is the PLACE To Be (2016 Americanlisted.com). Trump carried Ohio with 53 % of the vote.

Today is the day of giving thanks for Americans. I wonder if citizens of Ohio, and Michigan, and Wisconsin, and such places who are out of work, who live in modest homes and have little extra to be thankful for, are looking forward to the vast change that is about to overtake the country as the man in whom they have put their hopes takes charge.

I did a little research in academic databases for Donald J. Trump. I found many words of advice and encouragement from Mr. Trump that are especially appropriate for this day of gratitude and spiritual remembrance. Here are a few samples.

  • from:  Punday, Daniel. “Kavalier & Clay, The Comic-Book Novel, and Authorship in a Corporate World.” Critique 49.3 (2008): 291-302.

Businessmen can be vengeful too. Donald Trump, in his recent book Think Big & Kick Ass (Trump and Zanker 2007) which teaches how to be successful in business and life beyond, devotes an entire chapter to the importance of revenge. Part of the message reflects repeated-game or reputation concerns, but part is clearly reflecting an innate joy of getting even. The following passage illustrates (p. 198):

Most business writers won’t be so blunt and honest
with you about getting even. They know it’s the truth,
but won’t tell you because they want people to think
of them as a “nice person.” I don’t like to mince
words. When you are wronged and do nothing about
it, you aren’t “nice” you’re a schmuck. That is why I
say when you are wronged, go after the those people,
because it’s a good feeling …  I love i

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Take a look inside Donald Trump’s opulent Manhattan Penthouse. (Photo: iDesignArch.com)
  • from:  Hirschman, Elizabeth C. “Secular Immortality and the American Ideology of Affluence.” Journal of Consumer Research 17.1 (1990): 31-42.

Entrepreneurial achievement is closely linked [to the] concept of achievement motivation, and indeed, most of the persons whose lives and possessions were documented . . . are culturally labeled as high achievers (e.g., Malcolm Forbes, Donald Trump). Because the ideology of affluence is constructed around the acquisition of money and material possessions, many of those whose achievements were documented in the texts examined have succeeded as business entrepreneurs and in other forms of capitalistic enterprise.

[. . . .] . . . the primary theme resulting . . . was an advocacy of entrepreneurial achievement. Entrepreneurial achievements were those in which the individual demonstrated personal efficacy in some secular realm. Entrepreneurial achievement is closely linked to [the] concept of achievement motivation, and . . . the ideology of affluence is constructed around the acquisition of money and material possessions, many of those whose achievements [we have] examined have succeeded as business entrepreneurs and in other forms of capitalistic enterprise.

[. . . .]  Two best-selling autobiographies of current entrepreneurs similarly evoke the thesis that those who work hard and make successes of themselves deserve to be socially recognized (and materially enriched) for it. In keeping with Horatio Alger mythology, both Lee lacocca and Donald Trump present themselves as embodying the rags-to-riches tale. . . .  Donald Trump represents himself as an entrepreneur in its purest form—an independent person who built “something from nothing.” Like many of the affluent entrepreneurs . . . Trump is fascinated with acquiring possessions that will be recognized as the biggest or the best of their genre. Trump had reserved a triplex apartment on the top of Trump Tower for himself and his family, but after visiting a nearby apartment owned by Saudi billionaire Adnan Khashoggi, he decided his was not large enough. “Why shouldn’t I have exactly the apartment I wanted—particularly when I built the whole building? I decided to take over one of the other apartments on the top three floors and combine it with mine. It has taken almost two years to renovate, but I don’t think there is any apartment in the world that can touch it” (Trump 1987, p. 187). Just as importantly, Trump Tower made him a social celebrity: “Trump Tower was an unqualified success. It has given me visibility, credibility, and prestige” (1987, p. 191).

[. . . .] Trump also views himself as an heir. His father was already a locally prominent real estate entrepreneur when Donald began his real estate career in Manhattan. However, Trump was determined, and has succeeded, in enlarging the family legacy to international proportions. He clearly views himself as establishing a dynasty, has constructed several family monuments (e.g.. Trump Tower), has acquired a family estate (Mar-a-lago), and has begun to structure the possessions he intends to leave his children. One passage in his 1987 autobiography notes that a clause in his will gives his children control over the construction of future Hyatt Hotels in the New York City area.

[. . . .]  It is probably not surprising that an ideology celebrating the acquisition of wealth and possessions primarily seeks immortality through material means. What is puzzling is that social scientists in general and consumer researchers in particular have been reluctant to recognize this as a central motivation driving exceptional personal achievement and the oft-resulting accumulation of wealth and possessions. Although some criticize secular monuments as idols of materialism [we have found] little evidence that the possessions acquired by the affluent as a result of their secular achievements represented . . .  “terminal materialism.” Terminal materialism is “a habit of consumption [that] can become an end in itself, feeding on its autonomous necessity to possess more things, to control more status, to use more energy.” However . . .  media such as magazines directed to the affluent tend to put a gloss on the rich, rarely citing their failings or character flaws. Hence, we must look elsewhere to find evidence of terminal materialism among the affluent.

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Trump also resides at Mar-A-Lago in Palm Beach, Florida – See more at: http://nairobiwire.com/2016/01/
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“daily trench Twitter warfare”

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Aug. 1, 2012. Steve Bannon, left, and Larry Solov aim to see the late Andrew Breitbart’s… (Photo: Brian van der Brug, Los Angeles Times)

Steve Bannon has been, if not in fact, at least in spirit Trump’s strategist for some time. It would seem, at any rate, that Trump’s idea of being the President of Twitter comes from Breitbart via (most likely) Bannon. Has anyone researched Trump’s use of Twitter back to 2010? Is he going to continue to be President By Twitter, or will the “lying” media (or perhaps the sycophantic Republicans) somehow manage to shame him into stopping? Or have we slipped into the altered state of reality in which social media is the the arbiter not only of pop culture but also of affairs of state?

From New Yorker, May 24, 2010. “Rage Machine, Andrew Breitbart’s empire of bluster,” by Rebecca Mead.

“This pisses me off–this really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really pisses me off,” Breitbart said, as he sat at his desk the morning after the health-care vote. [. . . .]  he moved into office space in Santa Monica that is being provided gratis by a friend of his, Stephen K. Bannon, who is a conservative filmmaker and a former Goldman Sachs banker. Also moving in were Breitbart.com’s three Los Angeles staff members: Larry Solov, a childhood friend and a former attorney, who is Breitbart’s business partner; Darren Rush, the chief technical officer; and Alex Marlow, a young factotum who recently graduated from Berkeley. Marlow told me, “What Andrew and I have in common is that we have always lived behind enemy lines.”

[. . . .]  He checked Twitter to see what his detractors were saying about him. “How does @andrewbreitbart sleep at night knowing 32M more Americans will have health care????” Eric Boehlert, of Media Matters for America, a watchdog Web site, had written. With the left-leaning Boehlert, Breitbart engages in what he gleefully calls “daily trench Twitter warfare.”